Training your nose

The process of smelling is well studied and gives us a very interesting margin to make use of the plasticity of our brain to improve our experience with oils, month by month, and work on our associated memory with odors.

In a study presented by a former professor at the University of Geneva, Patrick Nef – now he owns a private research laboratory – explains that the neurons associated with the process of recognizing odors die every 30/40 days and are replaced by new ones.

That fact, associated with the ability of our brain to produce new neurons by plasticity – learning and changing until the end of our days – presents us with the possibility of dramatically renewing our “database” of memories associated with odors.

Why doing this?

Because smells influence our emotional states, our enthusiasm, our attention, our sexual behavior, it provides social information about family, friends and strangers, and even about food, associating bad smells and spoiled food or activating our salivary glands in case of perceiving pleasant smells.

How do we smell?

Our olfactory system always pays attention to detecting new molecules in the air, but once it recognizes them it takes 1 minute to adapt to the new smell, which is the time that passes from when it is perceived by the nose receptors until it arrives to neurons in the central nervous system. After this recognition, adaptation appears, and the signal is no longer consciously perceived.

What to do?

The smelling process is chemically defined: the molecules enter the nose and are perceived by three different types of cells located right between the eyes. That information is translated into chemical and electrical impulses that are recognized by proteins found throughout all the way to the central nervous system, within associated neurons.

We inhale for a minute and pay attention to the images provided by the smell. Follow the program during the day, always inhaling for 60 seconds. Keep the program for 30 days and start again.

It is done!

Let your neurons do their work. Just continue inhaling new smells, training your nose.

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